Tutorial – succulents, part 1 of 3

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I’m totally excited to share the first of my three succulent tutorials today! Seems like I’ve waited forever to post it (okay, it’s only been less than a week since I made it, but it feels like forever 😉 )! I thought I’d begin with my favorite, don’t know what it’s called, but it looks funny and was also the most fun to make! I think that the key to natural looking succulents is color! If you do not apply any luster dust or gel colors it will not look realistic. It is especially clear with this particular flower: When you scroll down in the tutorial you will see how it looks without and with color, and there’s such a difference! When I first started making flowers, I didn’t add any luster dust at all since I thought it was a little expensive and I thought it would be fine without as well, but now I’ve find that luster dust is actually the key to realistic looking flowers and leaves, so it’s worth the investment! But on to the tutorial!

You’ll need:

  • Green sugarpaste/gumpaste (I used Wilton’s leaf green to color mine, together with a touch of egg yellow)
  • Purple/violet gel colors (or blue and red if you don’t have purple)
  • Vodka
  • White luster dust
  • Medium size, soft, fluffy brush
  • Small, detail brush
  • Ball tool and foam pad

Here is a picture that shows the sizes of brushes used. As you can see, the small brush is tiny!

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1.. Begin with making an uneven amount of balls in green sugarpaste/gumpaste, all of the same size (I made 11). I thougt it helped to roll out the sugarpaste evenly and use a cutter to make sure they were all of the same size. The size you want is about that of a chickpea, or slightly larger. Put them in a zip-lock bag or similar to prevent them from drying.

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2.. Roll the first ball into a cone.

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3.. Flatten it slightly. Pinch the pointy end carefully with your finger tips if it is too rounded.

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4.. Place the petal on the foam pad and use the ball toll to flatten the round side of the petal a little.

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5.. Repeat with another petal and place them like in the picture.

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6.. Repeat step 2-5 with the rest of the petals. Since there is an uneven number of balls, cut the last one in half to make two smaller petals. When adding another row of petals; use the ball tool to press down a little in the center (Note that this is not the last row of petals!)

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7.. Roll two small sausages of sugarpaste/gumpaste and put them in the center. If your flower doesn’t hold its shape, support it with tissue paper until it can stand on its own. If it does hold its shape, you can start with the next step immediately.

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8.. Carefully paint the edges of the petals with the gel colors. Dilute it with some vodka until you have a consistency you like. You’ll need to add vodka continually when painting, since it evaporates quite quickly! (You might notice that I’ve already painted the petals in white, but since I had to repaint later it was unnecessary)

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9.. Use the small brush to made dots along the edge. Make sure you have very little color on the brush, otherwise the dots will be too large. Add more dots on the outer part of the petals than the inner.

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10.. When the gel colors have dried, paint the petals with the white luster dust. Use the fluffy brush, and make sure you don’t have to much color on it; it might leave you with white spots. Only apply the color to half the petal – the outer part. Adding the white gives you a petal which is a lighter green at the tips and darker towards the center. It also makes the dots pop out less.

That was it for this tutorial! If you have any questions, comments; post it below in the comment section!

Thanks for looking, and good luck! And make sure to come back soon for part 2 and 3! 🙂

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11 thoughts on “Tutorial – succulents, part 1 of 3

  1. Pingback: 4 months of blogging! | tarttokig

  2. Pingback: Trend Alert: Sugar Succulents

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